Reading the Roman Missal, Part 2: Oblation

by Erin Brenner on July 19, 2012

Is “oblation” an everyday word, and if not, why does the Catholic Church use it so much?

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Protecting the Tower or Holding Back the Tide?

by Erin Brenner on July 17, 2012

Language changes are inevitable. One way they happen and how to deal with them in copy.

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Writing Productivity: Measurements and Tools

Writing Life

Recently on the Copyediting blog, I wrote about how editors could measure their productivity: what measurements are useful, how to measure your productivity, and what tools you can use to measure them. Although writing is less linear than editing, productivity can be just as important to writers, particularly when you’re a writer-for-hire. You want to […]

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Reading the Roman Missal, Part 1: Consubstantial

Usable Usage

Closely reading the new translation of the Roman Missal gives us some excellent lessons in writing. This week: using “consubstantial.”

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The Many Dance Partners of “Enamored”

Usable Usage

What’s wrong with “enamored with”?

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Happy Bloomsday!

Writers and Editors

Raise a cup of cheer for James Joyce and celebrate Bloomsday with one of these activities.

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Moving Toward Correct Usage

Usable Usage

Is it “toward” or “towards”? “Afterward” or “afterwards”? And what’s with that “s”, anyway?

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The Trouble with FANBOYS

Usable Usage

FANBOYS can keep you from a comma splice, but only if you know what you’re doing with it.

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It Is to Be Hoped That You’ll Agree

Usable Usage

Last month, The AP Stylebook, the style guide for many American newspapers, finally gave up on restricting hopefully to its original meaning, “in a hopeful manner.” The stylebook now also allows hopefully to be as a sentence adverb meaning “it is hoped” or “it is to be hoped that.” (Read my article on Visual Thesaurus.)

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The Problem of Careful Usage

Usable Usage

“In careful usage”? Bah humbug!

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