Apa style guide

Posted on November 28, 2017 Posted by Bertha Perez

← Reading the Roman Missal, Part 2: Oblation Style Watch: The APA Style Guide Posted on November 28, 2017 by Erin Brenner Usually in this space, I aim to educate you on grammar, punctuation, style, and other language topics. Today, I’m looking to you to educate me. As a freelance editor, I have to be […]


2012/07/17/protecting-the-tower-or-holding-back-the-tide/

Posted on July 17, 2012 Posted by Bertha Perez

← Writing Productivity: Measurements and Tools Reading the Roman Missal, Part 2: Oblation → Protecting the Tower or Holding Back the Tide? Posted on July 17, 2012 by Erin Brenner A copyeditor’s job is to apply rules and style to a manuscript, to correct what’s wrong and ensure that the writing is suitable for the […]


2012/07/17/protecting-the-tower-or-holding-back-the-tide/

Posted on July 17, 2012 Posted by Bertha Perez

← Writing Productivity: Measurements and Tools Reading the Roman Missal, Part 2: Oblation → Protecting the Tower or Holding Back the Tide? Posted on July 17, 2012 by Erin Brenner A copyeditor’s job is to apply rules and style to a manuscript, to correct what’s wrong and ensure that the writing is suitable for the […]


2012/07/14/writing-productivity-measurements-and-tools/

Posted on July 14, 2012 Posted by Bertha Perez

← Reading the Roman Missal, Part 1: Consubstantial Protecting the Tower or Holding Back the Tide? → Writing Productivity: Measurements and Tools Posted on July 14, 2012 by Erin Brenner Recently on the Copyediting blog, I wrote about how editors could measure their productivity: what measurements are useful, how to measure your productivity, and what […]


2012/07/13/reading-the-roman-missal-part-1/

Posted on July 13, 2012 Posted by Bertha Perez

← The Many Dance Partners of “Enamored” Writing Productivity: Measurements and Tools → Reading the Roman Missal, Part 1: Consubstantial Posted on July 13, 2012 by Erin Brenner US Catholics have been using the new edition of the Roman Catholic Missal for eight months now, and the worry over the new translation has proven mostly […]


2012/07/12/the-many-dance-partners-of-enamored/

Posted on July 12, 2012 Posted by Bertha Perez

← Happy Bloomsday! Reading the Roman Missal, Part 1: Consubstantial → The Many Dance Partners of “Enamored” Posted on July 12, 2012 by Erin Brenner I was recently taken to task for writing the following in a blog post: That’s one thing with pet peeves: they’re our pets. We’re enamored with them. Do you see […]


2012/06/16/happy-bloomsday/

Posted on June 16, 2012 Posted by Bertha Perez

← Moving Toward Correct Usage The Many Dance Partners of “Enamored” → Happy Bloomsday! Posted on June 16, 2012 by Erin Brenner Ready to celebrate? Today is Bloomsday! Since 1954, James Joyce fans have celebrated the author and his works on June 16, commemorating Ulysses, which takes place on June 16, 1904. I’ve long wanted […]


2012/06/12/moving-toward-correct-usage/

Posted on June 12, 2012 Posted by Bertha Perez

Moving Toward Correct Usage by Erin Brenner on June 12, 2012 Last week, one of Copyediting’s Twitter followers asked, “Is it afterwards or afterward, towards or toward?” Let’s find out. The suffix –ward goes back to the Old English –weard, meaning “toward,” according to the Online Etymology Dictionary, and comes to us from the Proto-Germanic […]


2012/06/08/the-trouble-with-fanboys/

Posted on June 8, 2012 Posted by Bertha Perez

← It Is to Be Hoped That You’ll Agree Moving Toward Correct Usage → The Trouble with FANBOYS Posted on June 8, 2012 by Erin Brenner FANBOYS is a mnemonic device to help students remember that the coordinating conjunctions are for, and, nor, but, or, yet and so. It teaches that you should join two independent clauses […]


2012/05/09/it-is-to-be-hoped-that-youll-agree/

Posted on May 9, 2012 Posted by Bertha Perez

← The Problem of Careful Usage The Trouble with FANBOYS → It Is to Be Hoped That You’ll Agree Posted on May 9, 2012 by Erin Brenner Last month, The AP Stylebook, the style guide for many American newspapers, finally gave up on restricting hopefully to its original meaning, “in a hopeful manner.” The stylebook now also […]


2011/11/30/writing-blogs-you-love-writing-books-you-hate/

Posted on November 30, 2011 Posted by Bertha Perez

Writing Blogs You Love, Writing Books You Hate by Erin Brenner on November 30, 2011 Pick of the Week We all have our favorite blogs about writing; some of mine are below. Nominate your favorite in Write to Done’s annual contest. You might even nominate The Writing Resource. “Nominate Your Favorite Writing Blog: 6th Annual […]


2011/11/16/get-help-with-the-writing-process/

Posted on November 16, 2011 Posted by Bertha Perez

Get Help With the Writing Process by Erin Brenner on November 16, 2011 Getting your work written and into print can be a long, hard process. These articles can help you navigate the way. Get Started “4 Ways Inspiration Helps You Beat Writer’s Block”: Use science to break your writer’s block. (Writer’s Digest) Revise Your […]


2011/11/11/the-plagiarism-of-secrets/

Posted on November 11, 2011 Posted by Bertha Perez

The Plagiarism of “Secrets” by Erin Brenner on November 11, 2011 Earlier this week, Little, Brown pulled one of its Mulholland books off the shelves and is issuing refunds to those who bought the book. Released last week, Assassin of Secrets by Q. R. Markham (Quentin Rowan), was recalled by the publisher because it was […]


2011/11/09/on-account-of-my-peeve/

Posted on November 9, 2011 Posted by Bertha Perez

On Account of My Peeve by Erin Brenner on November 9, 2011 Recently I was writing a tweet and typed “on account of.” Something about it seemed wrong to me, but I couldn’t say what. I rewrote my tweet, determined to look into the troubling phrase when I had a moment. Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary defines […]


2011/11/04/results-not-typical-and-other-stories/

Posted on November 4, 2011 Posted by Bertha Perez

Results Not Typical and Other Stories by Erin Brenner on November 4, 2011 Whether you need inspiration, writing advice, marketing ideas, or a reason to self-publish, there’s a story here for you. Pick of the Week “Guest Post: Why I Self-Published My Novel … After Saying I NEVER Would”: Catherine Ryan Howard shares her reasoning […]


2011/11/02/blessings-and-well-wishes/

Posted on November 2, 2011 Posted by Bertha Perez

Blessings and Well Wishes by Erin Brenner on November 2, 2011 Last week, I struggled with a cold that left me empty of ideas for The Writing Resource. When I asked the Twitterverse for ideas, 4ndyman suggested that I stick with my cold and look into the phrase “God bless you.” It proved to be […]


2011/10/27/word-story-bludgeon/

Posted on October 27, 2011 Posted by Bertha Perez

Word Story: Bludgeon by Erin Brenner on October 27, 2011 This week’s word story is perfect for writers looking for a synonym for club that isn’t overused. Bludgeon Bludgeon can be a noun or a verb. As a noun it means “a heavy, short club that is thicker at one end or is weighted at […]


2011/10/26/voice-accountability-and-a-quiz/

Posted on October 26, 2011 Posted by Bertha Perez

← Grammar Bite: Making Media Agree Word Story: Bludgeon → Voice, Accountability, and a Quiz Posted on October 26, 2011 by Erin Brenner Over at Copyediting, I write a daily News Roundup. Each roundup is a collection of links that copyeditors would find useful. But I read a lot of great stuff every day that […]


2011/10/21/grammar-bite-making-media-agree/

Posted on October 21, 2011 Posted by Bertha Perez

← Word Story: Prevaricate Voice, Accountability, and a Quiz → Grammar Bite: Making Media Agree Posted on October 21, 2011 by Erin Brenner Subject-verb agreement is a deceptively easy grammar rule: a single subject gets a single verb, and a plural subject gets a plural verb. Yet deciding when a noun is singular and when […]


2011/10/19/word-story-prevaricate/

Posted on October 19, 2011 Posted by Bertha Perez

← Language by the People Grammar Bite: Making Media Agree → Word Story: Prevaricate Posted on October 19, 2011 by Erin Brenner Last week, a reader asked me to write a Word Story for prevaricate. Here you go, Mari. Prevaricate The verb prevaricate means “to speak or act evasively; to avoid telling the truth; to […]


2011/10/14/language-by-the-people/

Posted on October 14, 2011 Posted by Bertha Perez

Language by the People by Erin Brenner on October 14, 2011 In a LinkedIn Group recently, someone asked: Which one of the two is the correct usage? “The people that knew about the ceremony” or “The people who knew about the ceremony”? There was a bit of back and forth over whether that was an […]


2011/10/13/a-word-for-the-digital-world/

Posted on October 13, 2011 Posted by Bertha Perez

A Word for the Digital World by Erin Brenner on October 13, 2011 I started the Word Stories series because of a new project I’m working on. The project has me writing definitions for over a thousand words. It’s great to dig in to so many words, but I only get to use maybe eight […]


2011/10/06/try-and-understand/

Posted on October 6, 2011 Posted by Bertha Perez

Try and Understand by Erin Brenner on October 6, 2011 Does the following sentence from Adweek bother you: It is tempting—as well as, in liberal circles, heretical—to try and separate Roger Ailes from his politics. Some language pedants will be immediately drawn to try and and will insist that it should be try to. But […]


2011/10/05/testament-vs-testimony-it’s-all-relative/

Posted on October 5, 2011 Posted by Bertha Perez

← Dots, Words, and Juice: Three Books on Words Try and Understand → Testament vs. Testimony: It’s All Relative Posted on October 5, 2011 by Erin Brenner A Copyediting reader recently asked me about the difference between testimony and testament. Although both terms relate to evidence, testimony specifically refers to evidence from a witness, while […]


2011/09/29/dots-words-and-juice-three-books-on-words/

Posted on September 29, 2011 Posted by Bertha Perez

Dots, Words, and Juice: Three Books on Words by Erin Brenner on September 29, 2011 I’ve reviewed several serious reference books in this blog. But language books don’t all have to be serious to be worth reading. Sometimes they can be fun and entertaining—and still teach you something. Here are three books that fit that […]


2011/09/28/word-stories-adverse-reactions/

Posted on September 28, 2011 Posted by Bertha Perez

Word Story: Adverse Reactions by Erin Brenner on September 28, 2011 For quite a while in this blog, I’ve been writing Vocab Builders to help readers learn new words. Most Vocab Builders included four or five words, their definitions, and sample sentences found in the wild. Studying words in this manner is one way to […]


2011/09/23/celebrate-national-punctuation-day/

Posted on September 23, 2011 Posted by Bertha Perez

Celebrate National Punctuation Day by Erin Brenner on September 23, 2011 Tomorrow is National Punctuation Day. Jeff Rubin, creator of the holiday, offers lots of ways to celebrate the day on his site. In addition, you might view punctuation videos, like this one from the original Electric Company: If the new Electric Company is more […]


2011/09/22/forget-everything-strunk-white-told-you/

Posted on September 22, 2011 Posted by Bertha Perez

Forget Everything Strunk & White Told You by Erin Brenner on September 22, 2011 Recently on Twitter, fellow copyeditor CopyCurmudgeon offered this advice to writers and editors: Tip: Put down Strunk and White and slowly back away. Then forget everything they told you. CopyCurmdgeon then links to an article by Geoffrey Pullum, a well-known and […]


2011/08/31/vocab-builder-er-words/

Posted on August 31, 2011 Posted by Bertha Perez

Vocab Builder: -Er Words by Erin Brenner on August 31, 2011 Next in our series of words that share suffixes is -er words. The -er suffix changes a verb, such as run, into a noun that denotes a person doing the action, like runner. It also changes nouns, such as ranch, into nouns that are […]


2011/08/25/nine-words-to-avoid-in-your-writing/

Posted on August 25, 2011 Posted by Bertha Perez

Nine Words to Avoid in Your Writing by Erin Brenner on August 25, 2011 Some words really rile an audience up. Just read The Chicago Manual of Style’s Facebook wall on any given day. Suddenly the conversation isn’t about your writing but about your word choice. Online, comment areas are taken over by people vehemently […]


2011/08/04/take-a-minute-to-write-right/

Posted on August 4, 2011 Posted by Bertha Perez

Take a Minute to Write Right by Erin Brenner on August 4, 2011 Writing books abound. Some are invaluable, such as Natalie Goldberg’s Writing Down the Bones, while others aren’t worth the paper they’re printed on. Two books I came across recently, This Won’t Take But a Minute, Honey and Write Right, offer quick writing […]


2011/08/03/vocab-builder-greek-syn/

Posted on August 3, 2011 Posted by Bertha Perez

← You’re Very Organized, But Are You Very Trained? Take a Minute to Write Right → Vocab Builder: Greek Syn- Posted on August 3, 2011 by Erin Brenner Last week we looked at the Greek prefix epi-, meaning addition, above, or upon, to expand our vocabulary. This week, we’ll look at syn-, a prefix meaning […]


2010/12/17/my-favorite-language-resources/

Posted on December 17, 2010 Posted by Bertha Perez

My Favorite Language Resources by Erin Brenner on December 17, 2010 Whether you’re still shopping for gifts or trying to decide how to spend the gift certificate you found in your stocking, these resources for writers and editors are wonderful choices. And if you purchase from Amazon using the links here, you’ll be helping support […]


2010/11/17/vocab-builder-joyces-ulysses/

Posted on November 17, 2011 Posted by Bertha Perez

Vocab Builder: Joyce’s Ulysses by Erin Brenner on November 17, 2010 I found a wonderful new podcast recently: re: Joyce. Literary author Frank Delaney is deconstructing James Joyce’s Ulysses, word by word. Delaney reads a bit of the text and then unlocks all manner of literary references. It’s delicious. This week, some of the vocabulary […]


2010/03/11/Punctuation-point-the-serial-comma

Posted on March 11, 2010 Posted by Bertha Perez

← Weekly Vocab Builder: Grammar Week Weekly Vocab Builder → Punctuation Point: The Serial Comma Posted on March 11, 2010 by Erin Brenner Oxford comma. Harvard comma. Serial comma. They all mean the same thing: the comma that comes right before the and in a series. As in: Sean ate eggs, pancakes, and bacon for […]


2010/02/11/Punctuation-points-the-direct-address-comma

Posted on February 11, 2010 Posted by Bertha Perez

← Weekly Vocab Builder: Humor The Direct Address Comma: Quiz Answers → Punctuation Point: The Direct Address Comma Posted on February 11, 2010 by Erin Brenner Recently, this cartoon made the rounds of language mavens: The comma rule depicted here is simple: use a comma with the name of a person you are directly addressing. […]


/2012/07/19/reading-the-roman-missal-part-2-oblation/

Posted on July 19, 2012 Posted by Bertha Perez

← Protecting the Tower or Holding Back the Tide? Style Watch: The APA Style Guide → Reading the Roman Missal, Part 2: Oblation Posted on July 19, 2012 by Erin Brenner The Roman Catholic Church updated its missal last fall, and early reviewers worried the new translation wouldn’t be easily readable by most churchgoers. Those […]


/2012/05/07/the-problem-of-careful-usage/

Posted on May 7, 2012 Posted by Bertha Perez

The Problem of Careful Usage by Erin Brenner on May 7, 2012 Whenever I research a debatable usage point, I inevitably run across these words or something similar: careful usage. As in: Stage 3: The form becomes commonplace even among many well-educated people, but it’s still avoided in careful usage.—Bryan Garner, Garner’s Modern American Usage […]


/2011/11/18/fulsome/

Posted on November 28, 2011 Posted by Bertha Perez

Word Story: Fulsome by Erin Brenner on November 18, 2011 Some words travel a winding path to their meanings, causing language users confusion over what they actually mean. A word whose definition or usage is so hotly contested that it never fails to draw attention to itself is called a skunked term. It may be […]


/2010/09/02/the-chicago-manual-of-style-turns-sweet-16/

Posted on September 2, 2012 Posted by Bertha Perez

The Chicago Manual of Style Turns Sweet 16 by Erin Brenner on September 2, 2010 The New CMS Is Here!


/2010/04/01/the-grammar-devotional-learn-something-new-today/

Posted on April 1, 2010 Posted by Bertha Perez

The Grammar Devotional: Learn Something New Today by Erin Brenner on April 1, 2010 I’ve been listening to the Grammar Girl podcast for years. It offers grammar lessons in plain English. The Grammar Girl widget sits to the right of this column (scroll down and take the quiz!). I guess you could say I’m a […]